posted : Wednesday, January 8th, 2014

tags : reblog

reblogged from : small world :: byd bach

posted : Wednesday, December 4th, 2013

tags :

amysgster:






Noson wyllt arall yn Aber… ||  Another wild night in Aber…



Y Gwyll, Pennod 1 || Hinterland, Episode 1

amysgster:

Noson wyllt arall yn Aber… ||  Another wild night in Aber…

Y Gwyll, Pennod 1 || Hinterland, Episode 1

posted : Tuesday, November 12th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : don't freak out

posted : Thursday, October 10th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Menswear Robot

posted : Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

tags :

“ Welsh claim on first car…?

posted : Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

tags :

posted : Saturday, July 13th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from :

cyclingtheworld:

Pontsticill Reservoir, Brecon Beacons, Wales, UK

cyclingtheworld:

Pontsticill Reservoir, Brecon Beacons, Wales, UK

posted : Thursday, June 6th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Cycling The World

Random Welsh moment of the day:

cuimhnigh-i-gconai:

I was at Trader Joes earlier and they were playing Our House and I translated the “very, very, very nice house!” bit into Welsh and mentioned it to the guy making samples and he was like “Oh my god, that’s amazing!! What is it!!” “Tî neis iawn iawn iawn!” “THAT IS FANTASTIC! What’s ‘thank you’?” “Diolch.” 

And then he and one of his co-works started thanking each other in Welsh

posted : Monday, May 13th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Always Remember

lifeinpurgatory201293:

Dydd Gwyl Dewi hapus! Happy St.David’s Day! ^___^
A Celebration of Saint David and Welsh/Native British cultures, languages and people that have come and gone over the last 6000 years. <3 <3 <3 

lifeinpurgatory201293:

Dydd Gwyl Dewi hapus! Happy St.David’s Day! ^___^

A Celebration of Saint David and Welsh/Native British cultures, languages and people that have come and gone over the last 6000 years. <3 <3 <3 

posted : Friday, March 1st, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Algol Paradox

posted : Friday, February 22nd, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Astronomy Nerd

magnius159:

I think I like Welsh bagpipes a lot.

posted : Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Hydrophonic Breakdown

pli1018:

I should move to Portmeirion. I’m sure the film opportunities will just be POURING in, but they shot The Prisoner here and this gorgeous, Welsh seaside village has one of the coolest names ever.

pli1018:

I should move to Portmeirion. I’m sure the film opportunities will just be POURING in, but they shot The Prisoner here and this gorgeous, Welsh seaside village has one of the coolest names ever.

posted : Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

tags : reblog

reblogged from : I'm Not Angry, That's Just My Face

“ Few people outside of Wales have probably heard of the house-wife, writer and teacher Eileen Beasley who died earlier this year and her contributions to the Welsh language, which is a shame, as this woman was somewhat of a hero in her own rights and she deserves to be recognised as such.
Born in 1921, Eileen was the wife of a coal-miner who spent her life being a law-abiding citizen, bringing up her children through the Welsh language in her village of Llangennech. Having never done anything illegal in her entire life, she decided that enough was enough, and in 1952 she stated that until she received a bill and letter issued in Welsh from her council, she would from that point on refuse to pay her council taxes. She argued that as her village and the majority of her council district was Welsh speaking, she should have the right to use her own language when dealing with official bodies, such as the Council, and so, now 60 years ago, a campaign that would go on for eight years and that would be of huge importance to the Welsh language movement started.
Back in the 1950’s, the Welsh language was seen as backwards and had no real power in Wales and what started out as a polite, peaceful call for respect of one’s right to use one’s language in all spheres of life grew to include everything from hundreds of fines being issued to bailiffs storming into Eileen’s home on twelve occasions, stripping it bare of everything from tables and chairs to wedding gifts and personal photos. All this was done in an attempt to get Eileen to pay her Council Tax through the medium of English, but despite the strains of having all of her possessions ceased and trying to survive off a meagre coal miner’s salary, she refused to back down from her demands; i.e. for the Council to issue a bill in Welsh before she would pay. Her husband supported her fight wholeheartedly, and even spent a week in prison for refusing to pay a fine issued in English only for the non-payment of road-tax.
Then, finally, in 1960, the Council sent Eileen a bill and accompanying letter in Welsh, and on the day, Eileen went to the Council and gladly paid her council tax.
Eileen Beasley’s civil disobedience inspired hundreds of young Welsh speakers to continue the fight for the language, and while the language’s current official status cannot be fully attributed to Eileen, it is clear that without her eight years long peaceful resistance movement, it would perhaps never have become an official language in Wales.

posted : Thursday, October 18th, 2012

tags : reblog

reblogged from : SelchieProductions: Nam Aonar Ri Taobh na Tuinne

posted : Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

tags : reblog

reblogged from : Another World Awaits

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